Volume 3, Issue 4, August 2015, Page: 67-71
Estimation of the Biochemical Parameters in Baby Powdered Milk
Lokonuzzaman Ahmmed, Inorganic Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh
Md. Nazrul Islam, Inorganic Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh
M. Saidul Islam, Inorganic Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh
Md. Ruhul Amin, Inorganic Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh
Md. Sher Ali, Inorganic Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh
Received: Jun. 23, 2015;       Accepted: Jul. 1, 2015;       Published: Jul. 20, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.sjc.20150304.11      View  4999      Downloads  142
Abstract
This paper deals with the study of important biochemical parameters such as protein, lactose and acidity of baby (0-6 months) powdered milk of different brands available in the market. The percentage of protein, lactose and acidity were determined by using biochemical methods.
Keywords
Biochemical Parameters, Protein, Lactose, Acidity, Baby Powdered Milk, biochemical methods
To cite this article
Lokonuzzaman Ahmmed, Md. Nazrul Islam, M. Saidul Islam, Md. Ruhul Amin, Md. Sher Ali, Estimation of the Biochemical Parameters in Baby Powdered Milk, Science Journal of Chemistry. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2015, pp. 67-71. doi: 10.11648/j.sjc.20150304.11
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